I have a toy! My first toy….

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Several days had past without seeing Valis.  Celeste could careless if she saw him, or not. She was focusing on giving aid to the people she came to help. In the evening she would sit on her rooftop, praying and asking for guidance to give her strength.  The things she was experiencing was beyond what Geraldy prepped her for.  Day in and out she gave her energy to those who were less fortunate.  

Celeste didn’t ask for much, knowing that the Haitian people were limited with supplies, she stayed humble, and kept her needs at a minimal. She had learned at an early stage in life to be humble, in fact she preferred it! When growing up, Celeste learned to hunt for her food. She hand stitched all her clothing out of animal skins, grew her own food, and stored it for the winter seasons.  Very rarely did she need to go to the store to buy goods, except for her girly stuff, and cowboy boots. When traveling to Los Angeles, she stopped in Texas for a few days, where she bought her first outfits from a western clothing store, at the age of eighteen.

When Celeste traveled down the crowded streets of Port-au-Prince, she absorbed and stored everything in her mind.  Realizing how spoiled the American people were, and how much they dis-guarded their belongings with ease, made her sick in the heart.  She swore when she returned home, that she was going to talk to a toy company.  She had learned that no child ever really had a toy.  

When Geraldy, and Celeste visited the tent cities, she noticed a little girl holding onto a doll head.  She immediately approached the girl, sat down on the dirt, got into her backpack, and produced a sewing kit.  She tore her red western long skirt into pieces, and made several girls little cloth dolls.   She stuffed them with leaves, and soft debris that she had the little girls search for; In no time at all, the little girls watched Celeste quickly stitched the dolls, and handed them their new toy.  Geraldy disciplined Celeste about using her clothing.  “Celeste, if you don’t stop, you will have nothing left to cover your body.”  Celeste smiled, and said, they were replaceable items, and didn’t give a hoot, who saw her figure.  

Celeste was approached by more of the other children with material, asking her to stitch them a toy too.  So, she asked several older ladies to help out, and in no time at all, Celeste saw her work filter throughout the tent cities.  For the boys, she used her rubber gloves, and asked the boys to find her strong sticks.  She showed the boys how to make their own slingshots.  When she pulled her Bowie knife out of her boot, the children’s eyes grew with wonder.  They were amazed how she used her sharp knife to make patterns out of the material.  

She was surrounded by so many children begging to receive a toy, Celeste became overwhelmed with love.  As the boys watched her skilled hands whittle the sticks into a toy,  nothing gave Celeste the greatest pleasure as watching their beautiful faces light up, when they were handed their toy.  She couldn’t make all the children a toy, so she gave them gum instead, with promises she would return, and make more toys for children who did not get one.  When Celeste arrived in Haiti, she didn’t know a lick of French. Now, being with the Haitian’s, she was learning to pick up a few words, while implementing them in her vocabulary.  The people would laugh at Celeste’s accent, when she spoke a few words to them in French.  She loved hearing the laughter, it wasn’t a teasing laugh, but a good innocent laugh. 

Celeste arrived back at the school late in the evenings, exhausted and hungry. After she ate a little, she went to bed only to wake up, and do it again. 

 

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